The skin is an amazing organ, and the largest in the body. It not only protects internal organs and prevents infection by bacteria; it also regulates temperature, fluid balance, and Vitamin D production.

When the skin is burned, this functionality is impaired—particularly when the burn damages the interior layers of the skin. Burn victims must be kept warm to avoid hypothermia, must be hydrated, and their skin must be protected. In severe burns, the skin is at risk from infection at the open wound site and from surrounding dead skin that could affect healing. In many cases, the doctors and nurses use “debridement” to help remove dead skin so the patient can heal.


Continue Reading Healing the Skin after a Burn Injury

According to the American Burn Association, nearly half a million Americans suffer thermal burn injuries each year, resulting in approximately 40,000 hospitalizations and 3,400 deaths annually. Despite these alarming statistics, the survival rate is high. This is largely attributable to advances in research, medicine, and technology in the field of burn injury care.

Thermal burns can cause severe damage to the victim’s skin, requiring focused wound care, infection prevention, and even excision and skin grafts. Eschar excision and skin grafting has long been the standard of care. Skin grafting can be accomplished through different methods. An autograft is where skin from a donor site on the same patient is used. One benefit to the autograft is that there is no risk of rejection. However, the donor sites are painful. Moreover, autografts may not be feasible in the case of extensive burns covering large surface areas.


Continue Reading Advances in Technology for Burn Injury Survivors