Teens who vape have triple the amount of five different toxins in urine tests than teens who never vape. Pediatric researchers at University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), identified six toxins in the urine of vaping teens including benzene, ethylene oxide, acrylonitrile, acrolein, and acrylamide; some of which are known to cause cancer.

These toxins are called Volatile Organic Compounds, or VOCs. Acrylonitrile, a known carcinogen, shows in even higher concentrations with teens who use fruit-flavored liquids while vaping. The toxins appear in teens who use both nicotine, and non-nicotine liquids.

Contrary to the belief that e-cigarettes are safe, Dr. Mark Rubenstein, Professor of Pediatrics at UCSF, stated “Based on these results, if the teenagers kept using these products over the years, we believe it could be dangerous.”

Continue Reading Cancer-Causing Toxins Found in Vaping Teens

A new report by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, Medical shows there is “substantial” evidence that e-cigarette use increases the risk of transitioning to smoking conventional cigarettes.

This is of particular concern for teens who are in the group with the highest number of users. This “gateway” effect should concern parents and users alike who believe e-cigarettes are different because they lack combustible elements.

Continue Reading E-Cigarettes Gateway to Conventional Cigarette Smoking

A lithium battery explosion shut down MCO International Airport in Orlando, Florida for several hours on Friday, November 10, 2017. The battery exploded in a backpack carrying a traveler’s camera.  Startled would-be passengers scattered as security personnel, mistakenly believing the noise was a gun shot, reportedly told them to take cover.

Many people rushed back through security checkpoints. Others hid in nearby restaurants and stores. One woman reported that she and other travelers huddled on the floor of a restaurant for 20 minutes, unsure whether the noise was a gun shot. Travelers took to social media to report the chaos and ensuing confusion as well as to seek information.

Continue Reading Lithium Battery Explosion Shuts Down Orlando Airport

The 2017 FEMA report on e-cigarette explosions has linked product construction to the severity of injuries suffered in explosion incidents.

The study included extensive review and research into the construction of e-cigarettes and why explosions and severe injuries are more likely to occur with e-cigarettes than other consumer products containing lithium-ion batteries.

The results show that the dual-cylindrical construction of the e-cigarette product and batteries is problematic.

Continue Reading E-cigarette Product Construction Linked to Severity of Explosion Injuries

Much of the hype from the vaping industry centers around the message that e-cigarettes are a safer alternative to smoking traditional cigarettes. Without data to disprove the claims, vaping advocates have widely and publicly blasted that message to users.

Now, however, more and more medical studies have been completed and the data is not supporting the “safer alternative” argument. In fact, new studies show that the dangers not only mirror those of traditional tobacco cigarettes, but also pose new dangers not seen in combustible cigarette use.

Continue Reading Study Shows E-cigarettes Pose Unique Health Dangers

E-cigarette liquids come in 7000 flavors—many of them sweet like bubble gum and cherry. But there is only one flavor, menthol, in traditional cigarettes. Why? Because flavoring in cigarettes was banned by the United States under The Tobacco Control Act of 2009 to reduce the numbers of young smokers.

According to Mitch Zeller, J.D., director of the FDA’s Center for Tobacco Products, “about 90 percent of adult daily smokers smoked their first cigarette by the age of 18,” and the “ban….is vital to protect future generations from a lifetime of addiction” to tobacco like products.

Continue Reading E-Cigarette Flavors—Should They Be Banned?

According to a FEMA and U.S. Fire Authority report on e-cigarette explosions released in July 2017, the “combination of an electronic cigarette with a lithium-ion is a new and unique hazard” in the U.S.

The FEMA report which evaluated e-cigarette explosions in the U.S. from 2009-2016, summarized, “There is no analogy among consumer products to the risk of a severe, acute injury presented by an e-cigarette” and incidences of injuries are likely to increase.

The vaping industry has largely ignored e-cigarette explosions with dismissive statements that users are using them incorrectly, using the wrong chargers, and basically responsible for any explosions that have occurred.

Continue Reading The Unique Explosion Dangers of E-Cigarettes

Despite recent pressure from the high-powered, tobacco-backed vaping industry, Australia recently ruled to keep nicotine-laden e-cigarettes illegal in its country.

E-Cigarettes with Nicotine Ruled Illegal in Australia

A leader in the fight against smoking, Australia classifies nicotine as a poison and has a ban on e-cigarette products that contain the substance. Vaping fluids that do not contain nicotine are allowed for sale in the country. Continue Reading Australia Classifies E-Cigarettes as Dangerous

In May 2016, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced a rule declaring that e-cigarettes should be regulated like other tobacco products. Through this rule, the FDA exercised its discretion to deem e-cigarettes to be “tobacco products” subject to the set of federal laws that govern the promotion and marketing of conventional cigarettes. The so-called “Deeming Rule” has been a major point of contention for vaping companies that argue e-cigarettes are not tobacco products and any regulations on e-cigarettes act like a ban that will destroy the industry.

Recently, the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia upheld the FDA’s authority to issue the rule. In Nicopure Labs, LLC v. FDA, consolidated with Right to Be Smoke-Free Coalition v. FDA, the plaintiffs challenged the rule. Nicopure claimed the rule violates its First Amendment rights because the rule’s restriction on modified-risk statements prohibits manufacturers from making truthful and non-misleading statements about their products. Likewise, Nicopure claimed that the ban on the distribution of free samples violates Nicopure’s right to free speech. Nicopure called for “disclaimers” for e-cigarettes rather than the strict tobacco-like regulations.  The court declined that invitation, stating that “Permitting manufacturers to make unsubstantiated statements concerning modified risk tobacco products, whether express or implied, even if accompanied by disclaimers would be detrimental to the public health.”

Continue Reading D.C. Circuit Upholds FDA’s Authority to Regulate E-Cigarettes

While proponents continue to say that e-cigs are safe, a new study shows that e-cigs may be just as dangerous as regular cigarette smoking—with the added danger of explosions that can mutilate and disfigure teens and adults using the systems. The newest study measures five chemicals in e-cigarettes known to cause bladder cancer, including “nitrosamines” and formaldehyde. The chemicals are known to be ingredients in e-cigarette liquid. Continue Reading More Bad News About E-Cigarettes: Bladder Cancer